Where are all these resources?

I’ve seen comments online a few times that basically say the same thing “There are loads of resources for low-functioning autistics/autistics with intellectual disabilities and nothing for the rest of us”. That’s usually then qualified by them not liking functioning labels and so on but you get the general idea.

What I want to know is where are all these resources for autistic people with intellectual disabilities? In my experience, there aren’t that many of them – particularly when it comes to things like books, lesson plan, and curriculum resources.

For the sake of this post, I’m going to use the three support levels for autism in the DSM-5 even though they’re not particularly useful for individuals, they serve the purpose for classifying books:

Support Level 1: There’s a lot of books and resources here for students, especially primary school students. There’s also a lot of books and resources aimed at this support level for interventions and strategies. There’s less for teenagers and for adults but you can find a range of autistic authors offering advice aimed at this support level.

Support Level 2: Again, a reasonable amount of books aimed at supporting students and children. Quite a lot of books on visual supports and strategies. This area is quite short of books for autistic teenagers and adults though. There are some autistic authors offering advice at this support level but it’s significantly less than support level 1.

Support Level 3: Very little in terms of books or resources for students. I looked for them for a long time. Books like Tasks Galore and the Intensive Interaction books definitely are useful for this support level, but beyond that it’s quite limited. Strangely enough this support level has a few more books for teenagers at level 2 – and more books on sex education and autism from what I’ve found (of course, SRE is vastly under-resourced so when I say more books I pretty much mean 5 or 6 books instead of 1 or 2). Almost nothing for adults.

When these people protest that there’s loads of resources and focus on “low functioning autism” and nothing for everyone else, I have to really wonder if they understand the full scale of the autistic spectrum. Maybe that’s the issue with the spectrum? The idea of a spectrum is too limited (this we know). All I can say is that when you’re supporting an individual with severe sensory issues, who struggles to functionally communicate, is greatly impaired in receptive communication, has enormous difficulties in fine and gross motor skills, will likely never engage with the National Curriculum (for students), and will need round the clock care more most if not all their life…then you do kind of wish that these claims of “loads of resources” were true. Unfortunately it’s not and people who need help are not getting the help they need and deserve.

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