“I don’t think low-functioning autism is true autism”

Yes – I have read that (more than once although the wording was slightly different) online from an autistic person.

The endless battles over functioning levels or different types of autism do not seem to be going away any time soon. It’s understandable because it is an incredibly difficult concept to understand. There were times when I was supporting students that I found it so hard to understand how we could share a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Combine that with research that seemed (at the time) to indicate identifiable differences in Aspergers and Autism and PDD-NOS, and it’s easy to understand why just lumping them all together under one umbrella term in the DSM-5 hasn’t gotten rid of the intense discussions.

Statements like the one I put in the title are not that common – but the fact that they exist indicates that not everyone is happy about the merging into a single diagnostic terminology. This particular statement actually appeared in a thread where some people were trying to argue that autism was an amazing, positive experience for everyone. Understandably some people disagreed. The discussion moved (as they often do) to the comparison between “high-functioning” and “low-functioning” autism – and out came the line “I don’t believe low-functioning autism is true autism”. I’ve seen many lines of argument within the autistic community – but not often do I see people effectively “undiagnosing” huge numbers of people from the spectrum just to drive their point home.

Whatever terms you do or do not want to use, autism is a spectrum. Sometimes or for some people, it’s a positive thing – little more than a difference in perceiving the world, for others it’s a negative thing that affects every part of their lives and makes them miserable. You often see these two different groups of people arguing about this very topic on autism message boards. Then there’s everyone in between who tend to avoid getting involved in the arguments.

You don’t get to tell people how they experience their condition, and you certainly don’t get to ignore a huge proportion of the autistic spectrum just to make your point.

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