Cuts, cuts, cuts…

I imagine that a similar situation is playing out in other countries around the world right now – but this week for me has been a week of watching the funding for services for people with special educational needs or disabilities get cut.

I left my job working in a school because I could no longer cope with the disaster that was the special educational needs department. Even with distance I am kept up-to-date with the chaos through my old colleagues (don’t join a WhatsApp with old work-mates if you want to be kept “in the dark” about this kind of stuff). I read as teaching assistants were cut, resource budgets were cut, as students were reassigned again and again. I read about students I used to work with displaying increasingly disregulated behaviour – lashing out, biting, hitting – as their whole academic world was restructured around them. I read about teaching assistants being told they were now responsible for two or three students with moderate to severe special educational needs. I read about old colleagues getting sick, getting hurt, developing mental health problems…

Then in my current job I watched it from another angle – I watched as the news unfolded about projects designed specifically for people with disabilities being cut to make room for more “relevant” work. I watched as the organisation released blog posts and twitter posts. I realised that the projects for those with disabilities was being cut because they didn’t bring with them big headlines; they didn’t get the kind of attention the organisation wanted.

It doesn’t take much searching online to discover story after story about the failings of the SEND system; about the cuts to services and projects designed for people with disabilities. If you really want to you can find pages of how schools are at breaking point – and how this is failing students. What makes this even harder to deal with is the fact that the UK is actually quite far ahead of many other places worldwide when it comes to special educational needs and disabilities – and then you hear stories about how much worse it is in those other places.

I saw things that made me angry during my time in special education – I dread to think how much worse things will get if these cuts continue.

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